Why You Tell Your Story

A vital part of Network Marketing is events.  And a vital part of events is people telling their story.  These can build belief, develop confidence and get new team members over the line.

But only when they’re done right…

You have to always remember why you are telling your story.  It’s not your reward for a job well done.  That’s what your bonus check is for.  It’s not to recognize you.  That’s what the pin and recognition is for.

The only reason you are telling your story is to build belief for the people in the audience that they can do it too.  If you just beat your chest talking about all the cars, trips and money you have earned, you simply make the audience feel bad.

Sure you want to talk about and celebrate the rewards of the business.  But don’t forget to talk about the challenges, where you started from, and the path you had to take to create that success.  That’s when the audience will really connect with you and understand that they can do it too.

– RG

 

 

17 thoughts on “Why You Tell Your Story

  1. Hey Randy

    The vital part of Network Marketing is events,because by attendance and
    taking part in events,people feels being belongs to he organization.
    When you tell your story to these people,in the way a: “I was there like you
    now in this bad situation,you can get out like me.This is a good way to get
    somr people to be motivated and take action.

  2. This is a really great point. Whenever I hear stories about successful MLM’ers my ears are open to two things: what they had to overcome, and what they did to go through the obstacles.
    It’s nice to hear about the rewards of success, but telling us HOW it what inspires everyone to go out there and make it happen.

  3. I always feel better when the stars of my Network Marketing Company tell their stories how they started and struggled at the beginning and then they found their way to success.

    It gives me the hope that I can also reach

  4. My story. Deborah Hardnett, President of Big Thinkers Academy and CEO of Wealthy Sistas Media Group, interviewed me for a book project and asked: “What was it like for you growing up?” Allow me to share my story with you and relive my childhood for a brief moment as I answered Deborah’s question: “I am the oldest of three girls; first generation American born in Bronx, NY of Dominican Republic descent. My parents had a rough time building a new life for their family. We started out very poor. As a little girl I loved ketchup and mayonnaise toasted wonder bread sandwiches, sitting in front of the TV with a bowl of Frosted Flakes cereal with water instead of milk and strawberry Quik mixed in. I would be afraid to go to the kitchen of our small apartment by myself at night because when I turned on the light the roaches would scatter to hide and would run right over my little feet. I remember going to the supermarket with my mother and my little sister, and at the cash register, I could look up and find the look of shame and despair on my mother’s face with tears in her eyes as she paid for our groceries with a book of food stamps…” At a very young age I knew something had to change. That is why I do what I do. And am grateful everyday for the ability to help myself, my family and others to achieve and to achieve health which we know Is true wealth. Thank you for allowing me to share my story, Randy… ~Dr. Julissa

    1. My story. Deborah Hardnett, President of Big Thinkers Academy and CEO of Wealthy Sistas Media Group, interviewed me for a book project and asked: “What was it like for you growing up?” Allow me to share my story with you and relive my childhood for a brief moment as I answered Deborah’s question: “I am the oldest of three girls; first generation American born in Bronx, NY of Dominican Republic descent. My parents had a rough time building a new life for their family. We started out very poor. As a little girl I loved ketchup and mayonnaise toasted wonder bread sandwiches, sitting in front of the TV with a bowl of Frosted Flakes cereal with water instead of milk and strawberry Quik mixed in. I would be afraid to go to the kitchen of our small apartment by myself at night because when I turned on the light the roaches would scatter to hide and would run right over my little feet. I remember going to the supermarket with my mother and my little sister, and at the cash register, I could look up and find the look of shame and despair on my mother’s face with tears in her eyes as she paid for our groceries with a book of food stamps…” At a very young age I knew something had to change. That is why I do what I do. And am grateful everyday for the ability to help myself, my family and others to achieve and to achieve health which we know Is true wealth. Thank you for allowing me to share my story, Randy… ~Dr. Julissa

  5. Great post. Sometimes we forget how important it is for others to understand the struggles and we tend to just share the successes we have. People need to be able to relate so they can see themselves eventually achieving success as well.

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