Recruiting: It Is All Predictable

None of us can control what a prospect does; whether they join or not.  But we still have a great deal of control over our overall business.    That’s because when you add enough things together, you get predictable patterns in recruiting.

And those patterns will translate into percentages.  Once you know the percentages, you know how much activity is required to produce a desired result.

No matter what company you are in, over a period of time, a predictable pattern of percentages will develop.  It starts with the number of invitations you do – which will produce an average percentage of people who take a first look – which will produce an average percentage of people who graduate to a full presentation – which will produce an average percentage of people who become customers and business builders.

As an example, your numbers might look something like this:  20 invitations = 8 first looks = 6 follow ups = 1 customer & 3 business builders.

As a rule, the lower percentages are at the start of the process and they get higher towards the end.  That’s because people who come to follow up presentations have demonstrated a more serious level of interest.

Once you know how the numbers break down, you know what you have to do to reach your next rank advancement.  So your next three steps are this:

1)    Look back through your history and see what kind of percentages you have had.  (Your sponsorship line can also probably shed some more light on this.)
2)    Figure out how many invitations you need to make for your next goal.
3)    Pick up the phone and start!

You up for that?

-RG

14 thoughts on “Recruiting: It Is All Predictable

      1. it should be about numbers… people are not numbers, people are people and they feel if you they are just another number on your list. so try practicing building relanships first, then approaching people at the right time. when people think that their MLM business is a numgers business, their retention rate is quite low.

        1. sorry, correction ***

          it shouldn’t be about numbers… people are not numbers, people are people and they feel if you they are just another number on your list. so try practicing building relanships first, then approaching people at the right time. when people think that their MLM business is a numbers business, their retention rate is quite low.

  1. Great advise Randy. So many new distributors talk to 10 people and then give up because nobody responded.

    Sponsors need to setup the expectations of new distributors, so that they understand that it’s okay for people to say no, and that the big money comes when they persist and take consistent action over a long period of time.

  2. Hey Randy,

    Thanks for breaking this down into such simple steps. I am up for it and ready to determine what the numbers are for me in my business. Time to get it going at a higher level.

    Make it a great day!
    God Bless,
    -ed

  3. This reminds me of the law of averages that Jim Rohn spoke about. I also agree with David that sponsors should help new distributors have reasonable expectations when it comes to hearing the word no, as well as knowing that you make up in numbers what you lack in skill

  4. Great article Randy. I am a new distributor and very scared of rejection, but your post makes me understand that not every body i talk to will respond positvely!!

  5. Thx Randy for great information. Can we make some kind of proformas to record? If yes, do u have any kind of proforma which help us to record these information for betterment of new distributors.

    1. This will be different for every company and even different systems within companies. So best if you work with your sponsorship line for your program and then you’ll have the best idea.

      -RG

  6. Randy, this is one of my favorite topics. It is all numbers and each step can be improved upon and refined. Each one of us will have a different set of numbers based on who we are and who we ask. If you ask people you don’t know, who are clearly a walking “no” sign, you may need to refine your “who should I invite” antenna. I wish there was a standard and it is sort of like golf. You always are attempting to improve your game. However there are some people who in their day were the standard.

    Bill Britt was in a position that almost commanded people to say yes. His numbers are even more remarkable because he gave people real permission to say no. His numbers indicate his goal was to invite 10 new people a day, four days a week, to look at his opportunity. Of the 160 a month who heard the offer, 27 on average were willing to look. Or about 1 out of every 5 said, OK what do you have? I suspect he went through streaks of 20 or 35 no’s and then there would be a day when 5 would say yes. The moon has that affect. 😉

    Of the 27 that watched his presentation on average he sponsored 5 a month. Again close to 1 out of 5 who saw his napkin one on one or who came to one of the meetings would join his opportunity. The number of ways to show a business thirty years ago was much fewer than today.

    Over 10 years he sponsored 621 people. All but 304 quit, usually within 3 months. Only 62 ever made over $500/month in his program [perhaps $2000 in today’s dollars] and 14 built large organizations. Eleven made him rich and three made him millions. In other words he talked with 6000 people to find one of the three. Imagine if his invite was twice as good and the rest of the conversions remained the same!?

    In my experience letting the no’s mean not now or finding some other way to discharge the energy in a useful constructive manner is the real challenge. Which ones do you stay in touch with, which ones do you erase? Maintaining a contact list of 10,000 seems daunting when you barely can manage 10, 100 or 200, but the how will work its way out if you make the first move, ten times a day. [or whatever number fits your goals]

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